Voices

We have interviewed more than 80 people who recall their own or their ancestors’ relevant activities, often planned at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Birmingham (UUCB), which was a key gathering place for white liberals during the Movement. Mostly in their 80s and 90s now, they recall their own experiences and activism during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as the contributions of others who have passed away.

The stories that are presented illustrate the complexity of the cultural, racial, and religious factors that influenced the civil rights struggle and the ethical values and commitment that empowered those who stood up for justice to work together to create positive change.

Voices

We have interviewed more than 80 people who recall their own or their ancestors’ relevant activities, often planned at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Birmingham (UUCB), which was a key gathering place for white liberals during the Movement. Mostly in their 80s and 90s now, they recall their own experiences and activism during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, as well as the contributions of others who have passed away.

The stories that are presented illustrate the complexity of the cultural, racial, and religious factors that influenced the civil rights struggle and the ethical values and commitment that empowered those who stood up for justice to work together to create positive change.

These are the Stories of those who remember segregation in Alabama—whites and African-Americans who lived the experience.

  Mamie Brown Mason

  Alice Brown

  U W Clemon

  Anthony Liuzzo

  Anthony Bell

  Ben Erdreich

  Carolyn Fuller

  Sarah Collins Rudolph

  Charles Cleveland

  Chervis Isom

  Chuck Jeffries

  Cleopatra Kennedy

  Corey Shum

  David Walbert

  Shelley Stewart

  Eileen Walbert

  Ellen Erdreich

Interviewees whose stories are told in the film include an African-American radio personality, also now in his 80s, who talks about his struggle to register to vote in Alabama in the 1960s, as well as current obstacles to voting for some citizens; an African-American radio personality, also now in his 80s, who will talk about the importance of radio and music in getting the word out (in code) to the black community about the protests and marches in Birmingham during the Movement; and a white physician, now deceased, who oversaw the treatment of marchers and others injured during the protest marches and after bombings in Birmingham, including the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church.

  Eloise Gaffney

  Gordon Gibson

  Helen Rivas

  Ingrid Kraus

  J Mason Davis

  Jackie Mazarra

  Jackie Palmore

Capturing their stories was critical due to the advanced ages of many of the living witnesses.

  James Hobart

  Janice Williams

  Jeff Drew

  Jessie Shepherd

  Joanne Bland

  Juanzetta Flowers

  June Cuniff

  Katie Cook

  Leah Reeb Varlea

  Lone Broussard

In addition to Alabamians, the series features two of the children of Viola Liuzzo, the civil rights worker from Detroit who was killed by the Klan in Alabama after the final Selma march in 1965, and the daughter and granddaughter of Rev. James Reeb, the Unitarian minister from Boston who was also killed during the Selma marches. The stories of Anthony Liuzzo, Jr., Mary Liuzzo Lilliboe, Anne Reeb and Leah Reeb Varela are powerful illustrations of both the horrific consequences of racial hatred and the human capacity for healing and hope.

  Lula Moon

  Lynda Lowery

  Alan Dimick

  Marcia E Herman

  Mary Liuzzo Lilliboe

  Mary Turner

  Morgan Palmore

  Nims Gay

  Pam Walbert Montenaro

  Pamela Sterne King

  Patricia Reese

  Phyllis Benington

  Robert Williams

allies were able to transcend their own “kind” and fight for the rights of all people.

  Ruth Vann Lillian

  Carolyn McKinstry

  Edward Brock

  Sol Kimerling

  Stephanie Yates

  T K Thorne

  Tan Turner Bell

  Terry Palmore

  Anne Reeb

  Valencia Reese

Those who led the fight for racial justice had courage.

  Virginia Volker

  Walter Luft

  Misty Bennett

  Carolyn Fuller

  Sarah Collins Rudolph

  Charles Cleveland

  Chervis Isom

  Chuck Jeffries

  Cleopatra Kennedy

  Corey Shum

  David Walbert

  Shelley Stewart

Interviewees whose stories are told in the film include an African-American radio personality, also now in his 80s, who talks about his struggle to register to vote in Alabama in the 1960s, as well as current obstacles to voting for some citizens; an African-American radio personality, also now in his 80s, who will talk about the importance of radio and music in getting the word out (in code) to the black community about the protests and marches in Birmingham during the Movement; and a white physician, now deceased, who oversaw the treatment of marchers and others injured during the protest marches and after bombings in Birmingham, including the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church.

  Eileen Walbert

  Ellen Erdreich

  Eloise Gaffney

  Gordon Gibson

  Helen Rivas

  Ingrid Kraus

  J Mason Davis

  Jackie Mazarra

  Jackie Palmore

Capturing their stories was critical due to the advanced ages of many of the living witnesses.

  James Hobart

  Janice Williams

  Jeff Drew

  Jessie Shepherd

  Joanne Bland

  Juanzetta Flowers

  June Cuniff

  Katie Cook

  Leah Reeb Varlea

In addition to Alabamians, the series features two of the children of Viola Liuzzo, the civil rights worker from Detroit who was killed by the Klan in Alabama after the final Selma march in 1965, and the daughter and granddaughter of Rev. James Reeb, the Unitarian minister from Boston who was also killed during the Selma marches. The stories of Anthony Liuzzo, Jr., Mary Liuzzo Lilliboe, Anne Reeb and Leah Reeb Varela are powerful illustrations of both the horrific consequences of racial hatred and the human capacity for healing and hope.

  Lone Broussard

  Lula Moon

  Lynda Lowery

  Alan Dimick

  Marcia E Herman

  Mary Liuzzo Lilliboe

  Mary Turner

  Morgan Palmore

  Nims Gay

  Pam Walbert Montenaro

  Pamela Sterne King

  Patricia Reese

  Phyllis Benington

  Robert Williams

  Ruth Vann Lillian

allies were able to transcend their own “kind” and fight for the rights of all people.

  Carolyn McKinstry

  Edward Brock

  Sol Kimerling

  Stephanie Yates

  T K Thorne

  Tan Turner Bell

  Terry Palmore

  Anne Reeb

  Valencia Reese

We present a special focus on the courage of those who led the fight for racial justice.

  Virginia Volker

  Walter Luft

  Misty Bennett